Sunday, March 30, 2008

Shakespeare's church found in Shoreditch - This Britain, UK - The Independent

Shakespeare's church found in Shoreditch

Shakespeare's "lost" local church in London may have been found – beneath some flower beds and cracked paving stones. New research has pinpointed the site of the old church of St Leonard, which was the centre of worship and burial for many of the leading actors and personalities of the Shakespearean stage, including the Bard himself. A study of archive material has revealed that much of the building may still exist, buried underground in an extraordinary time capsule.

Kasie speak has replaced the Elizabethan English, but the stories are still very ‘Shakespeare’

Macbeth in Mzansi? That’s right. William Shakespeare is in South Africa and breathing new life into local television. But, should we care?"

Friday, March 28, 2008


Shakespeare Goes Digital

LONDON (Reuters) - A U.S. and British library plan to reproduce online all 75 editions of William Shakespeare's plays printed in the quarto format before the year 1641.

The Bodleian Library in Oxford and Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC have joined forces to download their collections, building on the work of the British Library which digitized its collection of quarto editions in 2004.

In the absence of surviving manuscripts, the quartos -- Shakespeare's earliest printed editions -- offer the closest known evidence of what Shakespeare might actually have written, and what appeared on the early modern English stage.

The project is designed to make all of the quartos, many of which are only accessible to scholars, available to the wider public.

The process of downloading the quartos will begin next month and take a year to complete.
Online visitors will be able to compare images side-by-side, lay one facsimile on top of the other, search plays and mark and tag the texts.

As well as highlighting more minor differences between copies of the same quarto, the digital database will also make it easier to study the often wide discrepancies between quartos, including some of Shakespeare's most famous lines.

"There will be countless new ways for scholars, teachers, and students to examine the quarto texts, particularly of 'Hamlet'," said Folger director Gail Kern Paster.

"You find out all sorts of things -- about how the copies went through the press, and also about the printing process," she added.

Shakespeare wrote at least 37 plays and collaborated on several more between about 1590 and 1613. He died in 1616.

Mistress Shakespeare - The New York Review of Books

Mistress Shakespeare - The New York Review of Books:

Shakespeare's Wife by Germaine Greer reviewed by Stanley Wells

It is now over two hundred years since the discovery of a love letter written by William Shakespeare to his future bride, Ann (or Anne, or even Agnes) Hathaway. Along with it came a silk-tied lock of the poet's hair and verses bearing eloquent testimony to his love:"

Mistress Shakespeare - The New York Review of Books

Mistress Shakespeare - The New York Review of Books


Shakespeare's Wife by Germaine Greer reviewed by Stanley Wells

It is now over two hundred years since the discovery of a love letter written by William Shakespeare to his future bride, Ann (or Anne, or even Agnes) Hathaway. Along with it came a silk-tied lock of the poet's hair and verses bearing eloquent testimony to his love:"

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

11 Shakespeare e-books in Macedonian Published

Creative Commons Content Portal for Macedonia published Macedonian translations of eleven Shakespeare plays as downloadable e-books, made available by the renowned storyteller and translator Dragi Mihajlovski.

The e-books have been published in weekly batches of two to three PDF-files between the 8th of February and the 20th of March 20, 2008. The following plays have been published under the Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 Macedonia license:

Комедија на забуни (The Comedy of Errors)
Веселите жени од Виндзор (The Merry Wives of Windsor)
Ромео и Јулија (Romeo and Juliet)
Кротењето на опаката (The Taming of the Shrew)
Тимон од Атина (Timon of Athens)
Од влакно ортома (Much Ado About Nothing)
Ричард Трети (Richard III)
Со сила убавина не бидува (Love's Labour's Lost)
Танте за кукуригу (Measure for Measure)
Кориолан (Coriolanus)
Секое зло за арно (All's Well That Ends Well)
Hath Shakespeare been a tourist in Venice?

It is a question that has perplexed literary scholars for years: how could Shakespeare display such intimate knowledge of Venice in his plays without ever having visited the lagoon city? Now Italian academics have challenged the widely accepted view that the Bard never travelled to Venice but gleaned information from Italian merchants who came to London on business.

Monday, March 03, 2008


The Haunted


The New Yorker Review of Macbeth with Patrick Stewart at BAM by John Lahr

Among the many contemporary things that Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” exploited in its day—the accession to the throne of the first Scottish king of the British Isles; the King’s fascination with witchcraft; the climate of terror that followed the Gunpowder Plot to blow up Parliament—the most significant for us is the Elizabethan public’s newly acquired appetite for hair-raising eloquence. “It was addicted, one might say, to the fortissimo eloquence of inner lives magnificently tortured,” Ted Hughes writes, in his introduction to “The Essential Shakespeare.” To the verbalization of tragic frenzy, Rupert Goold’s inspired modern-dress Stalinist version of “Macbeth” (starring Patrick Stewart, at BAM’s Harvey Theatre) adds a scenic and sonic frenzy that is symphonic in its orchestration and its penetration. Goold’s brilliant production team—with Adam Cork’s soundscape; Lorna Heavey’s smash-cut video and projections; Howard Harrison’s moody lighting design; Anthony Ward’s brutalist set—unsettles the senses and sets the stage for the deracinated and the uncanny. It infuses Macbeth’s crepuscular world with the kind of fear that makes your tongue taste of brass.
Shakespeare does Kodiak Island

A shaman marries a Russian Desdemona and an Aleut Othello. Behind them lies the mysterious and moody landscape of southwestern Alaska. In front of them awaits misconception and murder.

It’s an age-old story brought to light in Edgeware Production’s Alaska adaptation of Shakespeare’s "Othello."
Teach Children Shakespeare at Four, says RSC

Shakespeare should be taught to children as young as four, before they have become intimidated by the language, the Royal Shakespeare Company says. Introducing the works of Shakespeare to teenagers is too late, the RSC will argue.